Bugs and beyond

When we got married five years ago and I moved into his house, we started converting the lawn to flowers. It started very small – just a short hillside, which was hard to mow anyway. That was so successful that we’ve been chipping away at more and more of the grass every year.

We started buying flowers with gift certificates we received for our wedding: mostly perennials, some of them native plants. Now the only thing I will consider adding to the permanent garden is natives (though we do have annuals in pots each summer, too).

As the flowers have taken hold and expanded, more and more insects and other critters have been taking up residence. Who knew that swapping bluegrass for native plants would result in such a large insect community? (She wrote with dripping sarcasm.)

I recently added a list of my favorite flower posts to the sidebar. All five involve bugs.

Starting today, February 14, I’m going to start taking a look at all of the insects and other fauna we spotted in our yard this year. If I tackle one of these categories per week, at the end it should be about the time to start a new growing season! (April 8 note: I was right! Spring is right around the corner.)

But first, some bugs I haven’t yet identified (on plants I have identified).

Invasive creeping bellflower:

long green bug with legs like a grasshopper

Native black-eyed susan:

short black-and-white bug

Common milkweed:

skinny bug or arachnid - not sure how many legs

Joe-pye weed:

leaf damage - white spots with dark forms like tadpoles underneath

Butterfly weed:

long, skinny yellow bug

Common milkweed:

possibly a fly with very long antennae

Bee balm:

dark brown bug with a reddish spot and

Common milkweed:

light green bug with skinny grasshopper-like legs and very long antennae

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One comment on “Bugs and beyond

  1. Carmine says:

    The yellow one looks like a nymph of some sort…if you posted these in the Heather Holm group, bet you’d get some IDs: https://www.facebook.com/groups/PollinatorsNativePlants/

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